Strawberryluna

February is National Bird Feeding Month, tweet!

I am truly, a bird-nerd. I draw birds constantly, perhaps way too much, as anyone could tell from the preponderance of birds in our art and prints such as our  seasonal-based Cardinal series, this year’s 2011 Hello Birds Calendar, and We Fly On The Backs of Our Forebears, just to name a few. It’s no secret. I am also an avid bird feeder. I have feeders here at home and also at my studio and nothing makes me happier than a full house of hungry and chirping birds. When I am printing away in my city neighborhood studio in Friendship and the sparrows come and nibble while I’m laying down color after color, it’s really nice to have a little nature-based company.

Northern Cardinal

Northern Cardinal, male. Photo courtesy of birdfeeding.org.

Here at home, we have a really amazing variety of birds that come all year long and it changes with the seasons pretty dramatically. We get everything from CardinalsChickadees, Carolina Wrens and (my favorites) Mourning Doves to adorable little Titmice (yes! That is the plural of Titmouse, I checked!), beautiful Dark Eyed Juncos, Blue Jays, several types of Woodpeckers and many more. I and definitely keep my guide book to PA birds (a super thoughtful gift from Craig) close at hand so I can identify them all and geek-out dork style.

Red-bellied Woodpecker (male)

Red-bellied Woodpecker, male. Photo courtesy of birdfeeding.org.

In honor of my amateur bird watching and feeding obsession, I wanted to do a post here about February being National Bird Feeding Month. So cool. If you are bird-friendly or interested in getting started feeding birds in your backyard, or learning more about migration and other neato things about our feathery friends, visit The National Bird Feeding Society website, The Audubon Society and/or check out the below information & links.

Blue Jay

Blue Jay, photo courtesy of birdfeeding.org

From the National Bird Feeding Society:

The National Bird-Feeding Society is proud to host and sponsor “National Bird-Feeding Month.”  This national event was created to advance and publicize the wild bird feeding and watching hobby.  Each February, we introduce and promote a new and unique theme. Our theme for 2011 is “Most Wanted – America’s Top Ten Backyard Birds.”

 

There are over 100 species of birds that visit bird feeders throughout the United States.  For 2011, the National Bird-Feeding Society selected 10 species in two geographic regions to highlight.  These 10 species are among the most colorful and widespread birds that use feeders, and will provide you with a wonderful, year-round, bird feeding experience.  View America’s most wanted backyard birds.

National Bird-Feeding Month was established in 1994.  Read more about the origin of this celebratory month.

To celebrate National Bird-Feeding Month, the National Bird-Feeding Society is pleased to provide a Guide to Better Bird Feeding.

Also, definitely check out this really nice piece on National Bird Feeding Month here at Etsy in the Storque, chock full of info and great vintage photos.

Happy birding this month!

Titmouse

Titmouse, photo courtesy of birdfeeding.org.

3 thoughts on “February is National Bird Feeding Month, tweet!

  1. Pingback: In Pictures | In Pictures | Tinkerbell: tiny koala joey feeding

  2. Awww, that’s so sweet and sad a little too Kate. Maybe try a different birdseed? I use a variety that attracts a lot of song birds as well as some of the suets that I’ve noticed seems to attract the most interest. We’re lucky and have a huge variety here, especially in winter. I have my feeders hanging in our Japanese Maple tucked right next to a large juniper bush so they have coverage, and it’s still low to the ground for lots of seed-opportunities.

    I know hummingbirds are very fickle and are known to never return to an empty feeder, but from what I understand, most other birds are not so unforgiving :)

    Good luck and I hope that you can bring back some feathery friends.

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