Strawberryluna

New art print released: Spring 2009, happy Arbor Day!

Spring 2009, hand screenprinted, 2-color limited edition art print

Spring 2009, hand screenprinted, 2-color limited edition art print

Ahhhhhh Spring. It’s here! And just in time for Arbor Day (US observed).

Arbor Day was one of my favorite elementary school days. I swear we went outside in the fresh spring air in the morning, watched a new tree planting and dedication, had some cupcakes back inside the school room and then (!) Smokey The Bear would come visit and talk to us in the afternoons. Maybe I’m mashing a few special school days all into one, but I don’t care. That’s how I remember Arbor Day. So, I wanted to release this new limited edition art print on Arbor Day!

From a few designs I was playing with a few weeks ago, (see my previous blog post here and more designs here on my Flickr page here) I chose this one to be my Spring 2009 art print. I just love the simplicity and the surprising way that magenta and this tender, light green interact and work together.

This is the second print in a series of seasonal, limited edition prints that I’ll be releasing. Ready? Here’s the mind-blowing part – there will be 4 prints per year. Crazy! I know!

This springy dance is a 2-color, hand printed screenprint, with bright new green and transparent magenta inks. Magenta overprints green in parts to make a ruby red. Edition of only 50. Size: 16.5w x 22h inches (39.4 cm x 55.9 cm.) Paper: acid-free & archival Cougar 100lb White, cover weight. Now available for sale on my website here.  There are a few process photos that I took while printing this on my Flickr page here as well.

Doodle Time: Ginko edition

Sketch of upright green & yellow Ginko leaves and some unnaturally colored berries.

Sketch of upright green & yellow Ginko leaves and some unnaturally colored berries.

I’ve been obsessed with the shapes of Ginko leaves for about as long as I can remember, having grown up around them. The tree species was one of a great handful introduced to the United States via my hometown of Philadelphia by avid botanist and horticulturist named William Hamilton in 1784. Other than the admittedly terrible smell of the berries dropped by the female trees, they are simply incredible and beautiful.

Falling Ginko leaves and berries gathering on the ground.

Falling Ginko leaves and berries gathering on the ground.

Last week I started sketching and doodling with some variations on Ginko leaves, berries and textures. Here are a few of those doodles, designs, sketches, what have you, and I also put them all up on both my Flickr account and over in my Spoonflower portfolio as well. Feel free to comment and let me know which you like best, or, conversely, if you think they stink like a Ginko berry.

The further I went, the more it not only felt nice to be sketching, but it felt as though I was working on a textile pattern, perhaps bedding. Which, is extra nice. Sleeping is nice, and I’ve always been very interested in textiles, fabric, bed inens and their design. Odd, maybe. But true nonetheless. Still, it’s clear that I need to learn a good deal more about how to make repeating patterns. Even so, I figured sharing the designs might be fun.

Sort of a free-for-all in color, texture, and overprinty-ness.

Sort of a free-for-all in color, texture, and overprinty-ness.

The Ginko is an incredibily ancient species, with fossils dating back to the Permian period, some 270 million years ago. Amazingly, the Ginko’s loveliness¬† almost died out, only to persist in such small numbers that the species is listed as a living fossil. There is something very comforting and assuring to me about the lovely fact that something so beautiful could last for so long and throughout so many massive changes.

Yes, I am corny like that.