Strawberryluna

What I’m Watching: Best Of Enemies – Vidal vs. Buckley

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I’ve always been a movie junkie. I attribute my transition from childhood’s “All movies are fun!” sentiments to actually, really deeply loving film and movies to my Dad who harbors a keen interest and love for the form himself. On more than one occasion he handed out reprieves from getting my homework done so we could watch something great on broadcast television like Mel Brooks’ The Twelve Chairs or John Sturges’ perfect and perfectly American The Great Escape.

While working in the studio either screenprinting, packing orders or just cleaning up and re-organizing I tend to gravitate to watching old TV shows and movies (when I’m not listening to music or podcasts). Of late, I’ve been on a documentary kick, and came across the epic, whip-smart, and incredibly energetic film Best Of Enemies, written & directed by Morgan Neville & Robert Gordon, about Gore Vidal & William F. Buckley’s intensely bitter relationship. And it’s this relationship’s enmity that brought them both to wider recognition and audiences around the world as both political commentators as well as leading critical thinkers (for good or for ill) around the world. In this current Presidential election cycle, this film couldn’t be more current, prescient and on-trend.

Enough said, luckily it’s available in at the film website here, as well as on iTunes, Netflix, & On Demand. Enjoy!

ABOUT THE FILM

In the summer of 1968 television news changed forever. Dead last in the ratings, ABC hired two towering public intellectuals to debate each other during the Democratic and Republican national conventions. William F. Buckley Jr. was a leading light of the new conservative movement. A Democrat and cousin to Jackie Onassis, Gore Vidal was a leftist novelist and polemicist. Armed with deep-seated distrust and enmity, Vidal and Buckley believed each other’s political ideologies were dangerous for America. Like rounds in a heavyweight battle, they pummeled out policy and personal insult—their explosive exchanges devolving into vitriolic name-calling. Live and unscripted, they kept viewers riveted. Ratings for ABC News skyrocketed, and a new era in public discourse was born.

 

USPS 2015 Recommended Holiday Shipping Dates

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Hello! Here’s a handy list of important USPS dates for Holiday Shipping, around the world.

Please note that these dates are the *recommended* ship-by dates from the USPS and only the Express Shipping options can be guaranteed by both the USPS and your favorite online retailers. We always do our best to ensure that Holiday packages get into the mail stream ASAP for you!

We love playing the part of Santa’s Elves this time of year :) So if you have any special deadlines or requests, let us know! We’re happy to ship right to your friends & family and love to include gift notes too.

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* 2015 USPS HOLIDAY RECOMMENDED * Shipping Dates:
(Please Note: All dates are the recommended, not guaranteed. We do our best to get your gifts into the mail ASAP for you, but we cannot control various Postal Systems’ Delivery Times.)

For December 24 *Domestic* USA Delivery Are:
– First Class: December 19
– Priority Mail: December 21
– Priority Mail Express: December 23

For December 24 *International* Delivery Are:

CANADA:
– First-Class International Service: December 8
– Priority Mail International Service: December 11
– Priority Mail Express International: December 17
– Global Express Guaranteed Service: December 22

EUROPE:
– First-Class International Service: December 8
– Priority Mail International Service: December 11
– Priority Mail Express International: December 15
– Global Express Guaranteed Service: December 21

AUSTRALIA + NEW ZEALAND:
– First-Class International Service: December 8
– Priority Mail International Service: December 8
– Priority Mail Express International: December 15
– Global Express Guaranteed Service: December 19

MEXICO:
– First-Class International Service: December 8
– Priority Mail International Service: December 8
– Priority Mail Express International: December 15
– Global Express Guaranteed Service: December 22

CENTRAL + SOUTH AMERICA:
– First-Class International Service: December 1
– Priority Mail International Service: December 1
– Priority Mail Express International: December 11
– Global Express Guaranteed Service: December 21

ASIA + PACIFIC RIM:
– First-Class International Service: December 8
– Priority Mail International Service: December 8
– Priority Mail Express International: December 15
– Global Express Guaranteed Service: December 19

Happy Holidays to you!

Saul Bass Short Film: Why Man Creates

Here’s something great that you might enjoy as much as we do. In 1968 Saul Bass, the already legendary designer, created & co-wrote the short experimental film Why Man Creates with screenwriter Mayo Simon. Simon, most well-known for writing Futureworld isn’t the only Hollywood credit on this short – the young George Lucas was enlisted as a 2nd unit director as well.

Why Man Creates (posted recently on Fast Company’s site) is a wonderful snapshot of the extraordinarily playful + intensely serious thinking about Design (with a capital D) and intellectual thought so much a core foundation of Mid-Century American culture. There is no pandering to the audience, there is just fast-moving play & rhetoric mixed into one dense, small chunk of time and space planted quite firmly in a New York / East Coast vibe. We love it!

Bass’ description of the creative process that guided his career:

“Where do ideas come from? From looking at one thing, and seeing another. From fooling around, from playing with possibilities, from speculating, from changing, pushing, pulling, transforming, and if you’re lucky, you come up with something worth saving, using, and building on. That’s where the game stops and the work begins.”

Sounds just about perfectly true. We hope that you enjoy!

(Read more about the truly amazing Saul Bass here on his AIGA Medal induction page and also here on Wikipedia.)

Steve Frykholm’s Picnic Posters for Herman Miller

WHY_PicnicPosters_02One day out of the blue our good friend Terrence McClusky sent a link to an incredible little blog post and video about Herman Miller designer Steve Frykholm and his iconic “Picnic Posters”, created for the company’s annual employee & family picnics.

As young designer in 1970 (and Herman Miller’s first in-house graphic designer) Frykholm was approached to try his hand at creating a poster to announce the annual picnic that year. What blossomed from a simple side-project utilizing old school techniques that he learned in the Peace Corps is honestly so wonderful.

“It’s a sequence of events, one color at a time. And then that last one goes on and it’s better than you imagined.” – Steve Frykholm

Be still my heart.

Washing out a screen in preparation for printing.

Frykholm_PPP_washoutClick any of the images above or below to watch the beautifully done short video on Frykholm’s history, process and The Picnic Posters series.

Frykholm standing in front of the MoMA‘s collection of his Picnic Posters.

Screen shot 2015-08-04 at 2.17.46 PMFrykholm watching over the printing & drying process. Screen shot 2015-08-04 at 2.14.17 PMPhotograph of one of the many Herman Miller employee & family annual picnics. I want to travel back in time to this place and day…

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Happy Thanksgiving To All!

Happy Thanksgiving everyone! It’s been a crazy year for us, and we are so thankful for so many of our amazing friends and families.

This year we are hosting a big Friendsgiving dinning, and as always, Charles Schulz portrays this best.

We hope that you have a lovely time with family and friends eating just a wee bit too much and enjoying the warmth. And click the image above (or right here) to watch the Charles Schulz’s classic “A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving” ❤

From us to you, all the best & brightest!

 

Happy Halloween Vintage Postcard Round-up!

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Happy Halloween! We hope that you get lots of treats today and no tricks. Well, maybe a few…

Halloween is my favorite holiday, not just for the candy, but for the long and twisted road of tradition wending it’s way into the distant past, through history, pagan cultural artifacts and religious rites, harvest festivals and communal celebration as what we know now as Halloween is based on festivals such as Samhain traditionally marked the beginning of the increasing darkness that becomes a long winter.

So let’s get started with some vintage postcard finds! Anyone can imagine an iconic witch, as above, riding on her broomstick with her Familiars. And not that it’s not a beauty, but I tend to really love the more offbeat vintage postcards. Especially the ones where the narrative and the symbolism seems pretty obscure and stranger than normal. (All postcards in this roundup are clickable and will take you right to the sites where I found them too.)

For example, this fine bat adorning a pumpkin with a candle running horizontally and lit at both ends. The poem on the postcard shares a little folk magic.

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If you light a candle at the ends / Twirl it that the air it rend / Should the right end stay lit / All will be gay./ If the left stay lit, the witches stay / If both stay lit, you will be it. / If both go out, you have routed them out.

Good to know! If such home magic was once more readily known, I’d bet this below scene with a pretty young witch would also be of use, with many a candle a-lit.

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And while on the topic of witches, I loved these two below that sort of speak to a White Magic type of crafting more than Black Magic:

Halloween | Senos atvirutės

These two symmetrical, twin witches are wearing unusually light colors, and even their twin black cat familiars sport white collars. Look, all they are trying to do here is hook you up with the love of your life. So what if a little incantation is needed?

Halloween | Senos atvirutės

The same goes for the above lovely matchmaker. Her face radiates like the woman on Contadina tins, just happily cooking away with her white owls and black bat motifs. Perhaps the young miss below is one of their clients, hoping to find true love among the many pumpkin bachelors in her class.

Halloween | Senos atvirutės

But let’s move on to less beautiful witches, as they are much more fun. The below has something of a goblin mixed with a Cardinal going on, which is just fantastic.

Now clearly we have meandered over to Pumpkinheadville. In the below postcard, I am sure that Asian robed lady once was beautiful, but in this scene? She scares the hell out of me. And that is what All Hallows Eve is all about!

vintage halloween paper scrap (12)

A little flight into the surreal, with a false reflection of a giant owl? Or is the creepily white sheeted man a terrifying reflection of the owl? We may never know.

‘O! Charming little punks:

Now I present, two examples of a sub genre I love, where the Devil is being totally awesome at parties. Here he helps himself to carefully laid bounty of goodies with his (fruit? Veggie?) buddies:

Halloween | Senos atvirutės

And best, here he is planning the menu! With living anthropomorphized fruits, wine and a lamp looking on, and completely stoked.

Halloween | Senos atvirutės

Supernatural Mischief Chefs!

Vintage Halloween Postcards and Halloween superstitions from the turn of the century!  llittlemisscelebration.com

I’m also a big fan of the more spooky / supernatural themed postcards as well. Lots of Victorian “mirror gazing” and other small spells play out in scenes where the participants are hoping to peer into the future and see their One True Love to come. This one is especially beautiful with the young, fairly innocent looking girl’s shadow casting against the wall as a dark witch and her one-day partner in crime appearing only in the mirror. Truly classic horror movie stuff.

Halloween | Senos atvirutės

Nope, not scary or spooky at all.

Vintage Halloween Postcards and Halloween superstitions from the turn of the century!  llittlemisscelebration.com

This one is just gorgeous. How many times have I stayed up too late reading a scary book only to be regret it at the slightest sights sounds? Many, many.

Vintage Halloween Postcards and Halloween superstitions from the turn of the century!  llittlemisscelebration.com

Honestly? I just have no clue what is happening here. And that is awesome.

Halloween | Senos atvirutės

And while this isn’t a postcard? It’s the damn creepiest vintage kid in a Halloween costume photograph that I’ve seen. Eeeeee! Happy Halloween everyone!

 

 

 

Abandoned London Tube Poster Treasures

notting hill gate disused lift passageway Vintage Posters Discovered in Abandoned London Tube Station

(All images by Mikey Ashworth.  Copyrighted by London Underground and reproduced with permission.)

Like all subway systems and tunnels engineered by humans, the London Undergound has plenty of now-abandoned stations and spurs and passages.

Unlike most, there is a very special, and very abandoned, very non-public now-unused part of the Notting Hill Gate station that houses some lovely examples of UK poster design from it’s Mid-Century high point.

However, photographer Mikey Ashworth was able to gain access and take these photos. And you can see more of his photos here at Flickr.

(All images by Mikey Ashworth.  Copyrighted by London Underground and reproduced with permission.)

Above, good time UK Party Travel by coach poster, as imagined by poster artist Victor Galbraith, 1958.

The elevator passageway is well abandonned, but its original posters from the day the station was closed still hung on its tiled walls advertising all sorts of bright bits of the world of travel, exhibitions, film, toothpaste and more to no one these days.

posters notting hill tube

(All images by Mikey Ashworth.  Copyrighted by London Underground and reproduced with permission.)

The above “Royal Blue Coach Services” poster illustrated by the UK poster artist powerhouse and one of my favorite all-time illustrators, Daphne Padden.

These beauties are a stunning collection of illustration, type design and ad layouts from the late 1950’s, still in their native habitat. Which makes them extra special.

abandoned posters notting hill gate Vintage Posters Discovered in Abandoned London Tube Station

 

(All images by Mikey Ashworth.  Copyrighted by London Underground and reproduced with permission.)

Most unfortunately, for a poster and design nerd like myself, these amazing, vibrant and powerful examples of advertising poster design are completely inaccessible to the public and are likely to stay so for the forseeable future. Once the renovations to this station were completed in 2010, this abandoned passageway was walled back up and sealed off from use again.

Still, many thanks to Mikey Ashworth and the London Underground for publishing these photographs of a poster age (sadly) gone by.

Welcome 2012!

Hello 2012! We’re so glad to meet ya.

And to make you feel right at home, here’s a beloved classic that influenced us as kids, even to this day. Rudolph’s Shiny New Year, in it’s entirety. Baby New Year! Rudolph! Father Time!

We hope that your New Year 2012 is bright and the best yet.

Enjoy!

Hit Them With The Razzle Dazzle – WWI British Navy Ship Cammo

normal-wilkinson-inventor-of-dazzle-camouflage

The Father of Dazzle Camouflage, Norman Wilkinson

When you are interested in design, technology, perception AND history? (As I am.)  Sometimes a story comes along that feeds all 4 things.

This post, borrowed from Twisted Sifter does just this. And rather than blab on about why this is so damn cool, I’ll just let you check out an abridged version here and hopefully, marvel like we have at this ingeniuous and extremely cool graphic solve to a fatal problem of war.

For the full blog post with many more photographic examples, please visit Twisted Sifter or click on any image.

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You are the Fleet Admiral of the Navy in WWI what do you do?

THE SITUATION

You’re the Fleet Admiral of the Navy in World War I. Your ships are being sunk at an alarming rate by the devastatingly effective German U-Boat. The traditional camouflage isn’t working because your environment (sea and sky) changes with the weather. What do you do?

ww-i-dazzle-painting-camouflage

THE INSIGHT

World War I occurred from 1914–1918; back then sinking an enemy battleship was a three-step process:

Step 1: Locate your target’s position and plot its course.
Step 2: Determine the ship’s speed and confirm the direction it is heading
Step 3: Launch torpedo not directly at the ship, but where you think it’s going to be by the time the torpedo reaches the ship.

*Remember this is early 20th century warfare, weapons don’t travel at the speed they do today

So what’s your solution Fleet Admiral?

HIT THEM WITH THE RAZZLE DAZZLE

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Forget about not being seen, that only solves their first problem. Focus on confusing them so they don’t know where you’re going. Then their torpedoes will be shot in vain because they thought you zigged when you really zagged.

British Artist and naval officer Norman Wilkinson had this very insight and pioneered the Dazzle Camouflage movement (known as Razzle Dazzle in the United States). Norman used bright, loud colours and contrasting diagonal stripes to make it incredibly difficult to gauge a ship’s size and direction.

It was cheap, effective, and widely-adopted during the War. Check out the incredible photographs below.

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*NOTE: Unfortunately the images are in black and white, being from the early 1900s and all, so the loud, bold colours will require a little imagination. Can you picture a fleet of electric yellow, orange and purple ships coming to get ya!

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Wishing you all a Happy Thanksgiving in all of it’s meanings for you.
We hope that your holiday is as magical as this perfect Charles Schulz scene from A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving. Happy holidays!

Rad animation for Poe’s “The Tell Tale Heart”

 

In 1953 UPA released a groundbreaking and incredibly executed short animated film version of Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Tell Tale Heart” with art by Paul Julian and a single voice actor, the incomparable James Mason.

This short is absolutely top-notch. I can’t believe that I hadn’t seen it before.

The claustrophobic spookiness is perfection, as is Mason’s voice over in translating Poe’s main character’s intense sense of rationalization of his crime. In short, it’s beautifully creepy and does full justice to Poe’s iconic short story.

One of the few not-for-children shorts produced in they heyday of Disney and Looney Tunes, this film also has the distinction of being the very first to have received an X-rating in the UK at the time of its release. Ahhh how the world has changed.

Hope that you dig this little gem too.

Screwball Press 20th Anniversary short film. Yay!

Sometimes, it’s hard for me to describe what I do for a living being a screenprinter, print maker and rock poster artist. I’m not saying that this awesome short film on the amazing scene at Screwball Press Chicago (owned & operated by one of my favorite dudes around, Steve Walters) has all of that wrapped up nicely for you…

But, I am saying that this is a great peek into the lives of rock poster artists, screenprinters, the incredible Chicago print community, and some of our favorite fellow poster artists. It’s so rad seeing some of your friends, who happen to be mentors and design heroes get the attention they well deserve. You go kids!

I hope that you enjoy this short documentary by Sara Evans & Daily Planet Productions, Ltd. highlighting Screwball Press and a slice of the Chicago screenprinting community!

Produced by Daily Planet Productions
Edited / Directed by Sara Evans
Camera / Sound by Tom Bluett
Production Assistants: Travis Heberling, Karen Wittekind
Music by Cool Devices

 

Re-post from 8 Hour Day “Girls Just Want To Have Fun”

Yep, this is a full re-post of what I think is a great, important, and should be seen by anyone interested in design type of blog post. I think that Katie Kirk, one half of the lovely couple behing the design studio 8 Hour Day said it best, so I’m just spreading her words and images below.

So awesome to see some of the best women designers and illustrators out there too, friends, peers, and new to me talents who kick ass in this field every day.

*Please note – The below is a post originally written and collected by Katie Kirk of 8 Hour Day, not myself, so if you dig, also go over there and check them out, comment there too and support them as well. Cheers all!

There’s been a lot of discussion happening around a recent Good Magazine article entitled “Why We Can’t Let Design Become a Boys’ Club” by Dylan Lathrop. It has spawned numerous comments, opinions,counter arguments and retorts from all sides. Many of us feel strongly about this, and it’s definitely a subject with many shades of gray. Though we may not all agree on the matter, I think the fact that it’s being discussed at all is great. After reading through all the articles and all the commentary, I felt compelled to showcase some of the women that continue to inspire me. So here are some of my favorites–thanks for the inspiration, ladies!


Aimee Gauthier


Allegra Lockstadt


Allison Newhouse


Anchalee Chambundabongse


Angie Lewin


Anke Weckmann


Annette Marnat


Anne Ulku


Autumn Whitehurst


Celeste Prevost


Danielle Davis


Deanna Halsall


Eleanor Grosch


Elsa Lang 
(Always With Honor)


Erin Fuller


Esther Aarts


Gemma Correll


Gina Triplett


Gracia Lam


Helen Dardik


Jacqui Oakley


Janine Rewell


Jennifer Daniel


Jenny Bowers


Jessica Hische


Jessica Walsh


Jillian Tamaki


Julia Rothman


Karen Goheen 
(Two Arms)


Kate Bingaman-Burt


Kelli Anderson


Kelly Munson


Kristina Collantes


Lauren Gregg


Laurie DeMartino


Lotta Nieminen


Lydia Nichols


Maria Janosko


Maricor/Maricar


Meg Hunt


Melissa Buchanan 
(The Little Friends of Printmaking)


Missy Austin


Natalie Schaefer


Parliament of Owls
 (Meg Paradise, Lauren Sheldon & Ariana Dilibero)


Ping Zoo


Roxanne Daner


Sanna Annukka


Sarah Labieniec


Sara Lintner


Sol Linero


Susie Ghahreman


Tonya Douraghy


Tuesday Bassen


Valerie Jar


Veronica Corzo-Duchardt 
(winterbureau)


Sharon Werner & Sarah Forss 
(Werner Design Works)


Zeloot

Book Cover Design in India 1964 to 1984, from 50 Watts

Click to see more from this collection.

In my morning-coffee-stumble-through-the-internet-while-waking-up ritual today I came across a fantastically cool / I can’t believe that I didn’t know about this before blog, called 50 Watts, run by Philadelphian (yay! My hometown!) Will Schofield.

50 Watts is great little space of the web covering the intersection of book collection, design, and illustration. Sounds like heaven to me.  What caught my eye was an image from a post on now vintage book covers from the 40 year span from 1964 – 1984. Here, I’ve posted a few of my favorites, but definitely check out the full post at 50 Watts here.

And yeah, part of me wishes that I could read the text on these beauties. At the same time, they still speak quite clearly and the other part of me loves being able to make up stories about what these stories are about.

Click to see more from this collection.

Mostly, I just adore the flatness of the color fields, the kapow! of their graphics and layout, and symbolic style of the illustrations. Being a silkscreen printmaker, there is something so excellently familiar about the way that these were printed, probably cheaply, probably in a spot, or one color at a time process like screenprinting. You can see the areas where pieces aren’t in perfect register, or where colors overprint one another, and the use of halftones to mimic saturation levels of a color. All make my heart do little flips. The limitations of this type of printing force incredibly creative and freeing design and illustration choices, which, clearly I love and have embraced as a career. So, no. It’s no surprise that I dig these. I hope that you do too.

Click to see more from this collection.

Click to see more from this collection.

Oh happy day, ohdeedoh’s piece on our prints!

Click here to read the full post on ohdeedoh!

I woke up to a happy surprise today, the fantastic blog ohdeedoh wrote a really lovely piece on our prints! ohdeedoh is the perfect intersection of home & kid-friendly design, which is a really cool niche, as it insists on being very livable rather than high-concept focus. I love that. We’re just tickled that author  Sarah Rae Trover at ohdeedoh found our work and wrote such a fresh post about us. With the hand silkscreen printing process being so labor intensive (a “simple” 3-color print, edition of 100 takes 6-10 hours to complete), I can’t tell you how refreshing and awesome it is to see that a great blog like ohdeedoh gets it. Thank you so much!

Here is a little snippet for you:

“When it comes to artwork for children’s rooms it can be rare to find actual screen printed pieces that most parents would consider affordable. These 10 items all come in under $25 and are all handmade, layer by layer and color by color.”

With the full post right here, or click on the above image.

All of the featured prints above (and more, of course!) are available at my website here, or click any of the below images to see larger images and more information on my hand silkcreen printed art prints & posters.